Studying top quarks at high and not-so-high energies

CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is famous for colliding protons at world-record energies—but sometimes it pays to dial down the energy and see what happens under less extreme conditions. The LHC started operation in 2010 with a collision energy of 7 TeV, and ran at 13 TeV from 2015 to 2018. But for one week in 2017, the LHC produced moderate-intensity collisions at only 5 TeV—allowing scientists to analyze the production of various elementary particles at a lower collision energy.

May 2, 2021 - Phys
CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is famous for colliding protons at world-record energies—but sometimes it pays to dial down the energy and see what happens under less extreme conditions. The LHC started operation in 2010 with a collision energy of 7 TeV, and ran at 13 TeV from 2015 to 2018. But for one week in 2017, the LHC produced moderate-intensity collisions at only 5 TeV—allowing scientists to analyze the production of various elementary particles at a lower collision energy.